Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Alexander Calder

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I have been a long admirier of the mid century work of artists Alexander Calder, who is credited as part of the modernists movement. I have a curious interest in his life and work, but lately he has been on my radar more often due to the current exhibition at the LACMA, (which I plan on attending before it ends in July 2014). Follow the Alexander Calder information page on Artsy.com to view collections and keep in touch with all of the current Calder happenings and exhibitions around the world. 

I am quite fascinated with his iconic and Avant-garde circle of insider artist friends (who included Georgia O'Keeffe + Peggy Guggenheim). And also the modern kinetic abstract mobiles + sculptures that look so simple, but are yet so complicated, only an engineer (he so happened to be one) would completely understand all of it's working components.

Another chapter in his life that was quite incredible, were his jewelry making years. His handful of jewelry and metal work are considered highly collectable and rare, making only 1,800 pieces entirely by hand. He rarely used solder in his pieces and almost always conjoined using the rivet or wrapping process, using metals like silver, copper + brass. His oversize statement pieces are simple, but striking and most have a very chic modernist appeal to them, they can be viewed as a piece of wearable surrealism art. I just want to hold one in my hands, since owning one is most likely out of the question and budget (they have auctioned off for upwards of $500,000).

Alexander Calder found beauty in the things that we often overlook using industrial materials and scraps. He was definitely ahead of his time, being that his most significant pieces were created before 1945. I recently took a jewelry making class at my local community college, it's something I have wanted to pin down for a while now and finally just made the time for it. A few of the pieces I made in class were also created with a rivet process (inspired by Calder). I just love the handmade feeling it emulates and I now have an entirley new appreciation for this craft all the way around.

Some influencial women of style graced with Alexander Calder pieces included:




Peggy Guggenhiem

Textile designer Eszter Haraszty

Calders wife Louisa Calder



xx~syd






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